Symphony No. 3 Op. 6 "Variations"

T.A.DePew

Symphony No. 3 began as an exercise in arrangement using Ferdinando Carulli's 18 Petits Morceaux - a collection of practice pieces for classical guitar. Using piece no. 18, I initially set out to fill in around the existing melody and bass line but, as I continued to write, I found myself taking more liberties with the arrangement. Once I

Symphony No. 3 began as an exercise in arrangement using Ferdinando Carulli's 18 Petits Morceaux - a collection of practice pieces for classical guitar. Using piece no. 18, I initially set out to fill in around the existing melody and bass line but, as I continued to write, I found myself taking more liberties with the arrangement. Once I completed the piece, I decided to take additional pieces from the same collection to write consecutive movements until I had written enough for a short symphony. The movements are as follows:

Movement I, Largo ma con moto, as mentioned, uses no.18 from Carulli's Petits Morceaux and in large part stays faithful to the structure and content of that piece. The piece itself is in a rondo/theme & variations form and stays very near to its home key. The main theme (found in the Flute at first) is passed between the instruments throughout. The coda of the piece presents an interesting foreshadow to the second movement.

Movement II, Lento arioso, marks the departure from arrangement and ventures into the realm of variation. While part of the the opening, secondary theme chord progression, and closing are derived from Petits Morceaux's piece no. 11, the bulk of the movement contains original content. Oddly, the opening alludes to A minor while the key states F Major, but the movement in total remains mostly in the dominant C Major only to resolve finally in the appropriate F Major.

Movement III, Moderato animato, continues the now established practice of borrowing minimal material from the source (no. 14) and containing primarily original material. The melody is of Carulli's and the rest of the piece is built around it with the exception of the counter melody. Finally, Movement IV, Allegro assai, concludes the piece in fanfare using a selection from Carulli's 24 Pièces . Taking no. 20 from this set, the movement uses the original melody, plus 2 variations to present a spectacle in rondo form and close out the piece with good energy. The movement itself is markedly different from its predecessors in that it is focused more on the ensemble as opposed to accompaniment of solo instruments and melody.

T.A.DePew 2020

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